The Lake

Sometimes, a walk by the Lake is therapeutic. ~ Hints Of Life

The Lake

The view of The Lake at Central Park

Nothing is more memorable than a smell. One scent can be unexpected, momentary and fleeting, yet conjure up a childhood summer beside a lake in the mountains- Diane Ackerman. Such our my feels except instead of the mountains it was a beautiful walk by the Lake at Central Park.

It was a perfect Sunday in New York city with abundant sunshine and an everlasting blue horizon. The one day in the week to laze and relax. After a late brunch with my husband at Vive La Crepe on Columbus Avenue between West 68th & 69th street, we decided to head to Central Park for a walk. Our walk started right from our brunch spot as Central Park was just a 10 minute walk from there.

Mallard Ducks

A school of Mallard Ducks attracted quite an audience

The Lake
The Lake that is spread over 20-acre is the largest of Central Park’s naturalistic water bodies. It is located Mid-Park from West 71st to West 78th Streets. Park designers Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux created the Lake from a former swamp, for boating in the summer and ice-skating in the winter.

In 2012 the Central Park Conservancy completed the comprehensive restoration of the Lake and its surrounding landscapes. With the water’s edge having slowly crumbled and eroded through the years, the Conservancy set out in 2006 to stabilize its shoreline.

What the team did..?
The team excavated and removed excess sediments, then reconstructed the shoreline with rustic boulders on a stabilized gravel base. Using coir logs, created from the binding of coconut fibers with biodegradable netting, the Conservancy reconstructed the vast shoreline staked at the base of the slope where the normal water level meets the shoreline, the logs serve to protect the Lake’s edge from erosion until plants can become established. The coir logs are a sustainable solution to the Lake’s restoration, and one that’s helping preserve the beauty of its lush landscapes and the health of its wildlife habitat.

The Lake_Flowers

Black-eyed Susan blooming at the foot of The Lake

As we entered the park from West 71 street entrance, it took us to the Lake through the Strawberry Fields. A living memorial to the world-famous singer, songwriter and peace activist, John Lennon. It was serene and tranquil as we circled  the Lake at medium pace. At the North-West side of the Lake we were greeted by a school of handsome male Mallard ducks, who attracted quite an audience for themselves.  It was a sight to watch them swim in the water and listen to their quack.

Just ahead I spotted a beautiful bed of Black-eyed Susan flowers. The flower a deep yellow with a dominant black center is native to the United States. It is a very versatile plant and can grow in damp to dry and sunny to shady conditions. The Black-eyed Susan is the state flower of Maryland.

A World-Class Urban Park, Central Park is just the kind of escape one needs in the Big Apple, which records the highest population density of any major city in the United States, with over 27,000 people per square mile.

So fellas make your way to the park soon!

Source:
http://www.centralparknyc.org/things-to-see-and-do/attractions/lake.html
http://www.centralparknyc.org/things-to-see-and-do/bloom-guide/blooms/black-eyed-susan.html?season=
https://www1.nyc.gov/site/planning/data-maps/nyc-population/population-facts.page

© All rights reserved  © hintsoflifesite.com

About the Author

Posted by

A tennis player, nature lover, sun worshipper, music buff and now a blogger.

7 Comments

Add a Response

Your name, email address, and comment are required. We will not publish your email.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The following HTML tags can be used in the comment field: <a href="" title="" rel=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <pre> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

%d bloggers like this: