Shakespeare Garden

Parks are a bouquet of blossoming flowers, created by mankind, a tribute for his love for nature ~ Hints Of Life

Shakespeare Garden

The staircase leading to Shakespeare Garden at Central Park

The summer days in Central Park are marvelous and the sublime beauty of its surroundings is breathtaking. One often sees people looking for cool spots to spend time relaxing and enjoying their day in the company of nature. And I was ‘one’ among many others with the same idea – a cool, quiet spot for some ‘me’ time in the gorgeous summer afternoon.

Trying my luck and taking my chances I started walking around the park looking for that ideal spot. And who would have know, in the next 20 minutes I was standing in the Shakespeare Garden just as I passed through ‘The Swedish Cottage’. The Garden is nestled between Belvedere Castle and The Swedish Cottage. Known to be one of the most beautiful hidden gems in Central Park, this was a perfect spot for me to read my current book- Lady Almina and the real Downton Abbey and savor some delicious butter croissants and lemonade. For my readers who loved the Emmy Award-winning show Downton Abbey and were teary eyed as the show ended on December 25, 2015, this book is a great read. Based on real-life inspiration and setting, Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey tells the story behind Highclere Castle and the life of one of its most famous inhabitants, Lady Almina, the 5th Countess of Carnarvon. The book will take you into the real life of real characters.

Shakespeare Garden_3

The beautiful bench was my companion for the afternoon

Shakespeare Garden
Shakespeare gardens, created out of reverence for the bard, can be found throughout many locations in both the US and Britain. Of these gardens, one of the most famous is that found in Central Park, located on the West Side of the park and 79th street.

Formerly known as the Garden of the Heart, in 1916, the Garden was renamed the Shakespeare Garden to mark the 300th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Following in the tradition of already established Shakespeare Gardens, the Garden was filled with the beautiful plants and flowers mentioned in the works of the playwright, as well as those featured in his own private garden in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Sitting on the lovely bench in the Garden (as shown in the second picture) I relished the sweet smell of the roses around me. Quiet, peaceful and quaint the other occupants in the Garden were a few couples, and some pass byers. As I walked around the garden I identified some flowers like Catmint and Annabelle Hydrangea.

The Garden covers four acres of plants that change according to season. Included among these are plants such as rosemary and pansies, alluded to by Ophelia in Hamlet, thistle, mentioned in the play Much Ado About Nothing, and even a white mulberry tree that is said to have grown from a graft of a tree planted by Shakespeare himself in 1602. To aid you in your quest to identify the various species of plant life located within the space, bronze plaques with corresponding quotations from Shakespeare’s plays have been placed sporadically along the path. The Garden is located near the Delacorte Theatre, the site of the annual “Shakespeare in the Park” series held in the summer. Anyone visiting Central Park in the summer, Shakespeare in the Park is highly recommend, a must watch.

Due to its serene and romantic atmosphere, the Garden is also a popular spot for wedding ceremonies which you might witness while visiting the Garden on a Sunday afternoon.

Hey New Yorkers, so is ‘Shakespeare Garden’ the next Sunday spot for you? Do share your comments below.

Sources:
About Shakespeare Garden
http://www.centralpark.com/guide/attractions/shakespeare-garden.html

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About the Author

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A tennis player, nature lover, sun worshipper, music buff and now a blogger.

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